Shaper: Nick Hungerford


Transcript of the show
I knew I wanted to be an entrepreneur when I realised if I didn’t do it I would live with regret – regret of being in the daily grind and under someone else’s thumb.

The atmosphere and the vibe when I was studying at Stanford were so transformational that it gave me the confidence to start my journey.

I was literally working in a garage in Silicon Valley putting this plan together.

In the investment management industry we look after people’s money for them. We hopefully make it grow and we certainly protect it when the markets are choppy.

Some people in my life would say my stubbornness is a bit of a differentiator, which can be taken as a strength as well as a frustration.

I pitched to 46 investors before landing on one that shared my vision, and now we’ve proved that vision can become a reality.

The people in our team work phenomenally hard. They are often found asleep at their desks at 2 or 3am programming…

There are two types of entrepreneur: there is the one that wants to do it purely to make money, and there is the one that wants to build something that is going to change the world.

I think being open and encouraging entrepreneurship through other people is vital.

You have to compete and you have to be open and honest with yourself to drive improvement. Don’t ever get too content. 

Nick Hungerford

Nick is the founding CEO of Nutmeg. Following a business degree at Exeter University, Nick worked at Barclays in the areas of product, banking and wealth management. Nick was a Divisional Director at Brewin Dolphin and has an MBA from Stanford University in the United States. Nick’s industry and investment views are respected globally and he frequently appears on Bloomberg, CNBC and BBC and has been quoted in the Financial Times, Wall Street Journal and many international publications. Nick has been a guest lecturer at academic institutions including Harvard, Stanford and London Business School and has represented UKTI around the world, promoting the benefits of doing business in Britain.

Leave your response

  • (will not be published)