Shaper: Afroditi Krassa

Show aired on 12th November 2016

Transcript

Afroditi Krassa was born in Greece and moved to the UK as a student where she studied product design at Central Saint Martins, followed by an MA in Design Products at the Royal College of Art. Afroditi worked at design consultancy firm PriestmanGoode as junior designer and was the first female designer to be employed by design duo Seymourpowell, before funding her own studio.

Her work has appeared in art and design publications worldwide and has been televised by the BBC, Channel 4 and CNN. She has designed over 75 hospitality brands and interiors, including Dishoom and Heson Blumenthal.

Listen live at 9am Saturday.

Follow Afroditi on Twitter @AfroditiKrassa.

I was about sixteen and I thought I know in my heart that I will always be an employer rather than employee.

The way we were raised in our family, we weren’t very good at listening to other people, and still I am not good at listening to other people.

I remember taking the school bus on my way home every day from school and I would constantly think…if I was to redesign it, it would be much more efficient.

I always saw design as a way to solve problems or make things better…

I would cook and draw and build things and generally be very, very enamoured with the idea of spending time on my own thinking things and making things and drawing things.

At the time design was completely unknown, I didn’t even know it existed as a profession so my only option in my head was to be either an architect or a graphic designer.

I bought a Vespa, I bought a laptop and I thought ‘I am in business’.

I would literally pack all my work in a suitcase and go to Japan, to New York, to Paris, to Germany and display my stuff and try to meet people…

Disorganisation might not be the most accurate way of explaining because I am generally organised, it’s just that I don’t make extremely long-term plans.

If in five years I don’t have great people around me, great clients, great collaborators, great colleagues then I wouldn’t count that as a success in my book.

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