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Jazz Shapers

Shaper: Misha Nonoo

Transcript

Elliot Moss
Welcome to the Jazz Shapers podcast from Mishcon de Reya. What you are about to hear was originally broadcast on Jazz FM however music has been cut or shortened due to rights issues.

Welcome to Jazz Shapers, it is where the Shapers of Business join the Shapers of Jazz, Soul and Blues. I am Elliot Moss. Our guest today is Misha Nonoo, Founder and Creative Director of Misha Nonoo, the women’s fashionwear label with sustainability at its core. Born in Bahrain, raised in London, Misha wanted to be a fashion designer from the age of eleven. She won industry recognition for her eponymous label founded in 2011 when she became a finalist for the 2013 CFDA Vogue Fashion Fund. Misha established on-demand manufacturing and in case you didn’t know one of the dark secrets of the fashion industry is that large quantities of unsold inventory often end up in landfill. Misha’s on-demand manufacturing means each piece ordered through her website is made specifically for that customer and delivered in five days. No wholesale or inventory. She was also the first designer to use social media as a venue for fashion shows, exclusively debuting her spring/summer 2016 collection on Instagram and autumn 2016 collection on Snapchat instead of a runway show. We will talk to Misha about all of this and her month long pop-up in London offering sustainable styling advice, panels, workshops and more. We’ve also got the wonderful sounds of amongst others Alex Malheiros & Banda Utopia as well as James Brown and Kurt Elling. That’s today’s Jazz Shapers, here’s the Baylor Project with Our Love Is Here To Stay.

That was the Baylor Project with Our Love Is Here To Stay. As billed earlier, Misha Nonoo is my Business Shaper and I am really pleased to welcome here all the way from the other side of the pond. Hello.

Misha Nonoo
Hello. Thank you for having me.

Elliot Moss
Absolute pleasure. Thank you for joining. Now here we are in not so sunny June. Tell me why you are here before we start talking about this business. What’s going on right now for you?

Misha Nonoo
Well I am based in New York but actually I am in London every eight weeks or so because my family is here and I am half English to begin with and was brought up here but I am here for the whole month of June opening our first ever pop-up shop. We’ve been an online only brand up until this point and now we are doing our first ever bricks and mortar retail experience which has been extraordinary.

Elliot Moss
Extraordinary because it is quite tiring?

Misha Nonoo
I was just complaining about the fact that I am exhausted but I think it is the rain that’s doing that. But it is tiring but it is also extraordinary in that I get to meet this woman and I feel as though you can liken it… I never dated online but it’s like for the past two and a half years I have been online dating with all these woman and now I get to meet them, they come into the store, they come to meet me you know, we talk about the clothes, we talk about what they do every day and it has really been the most fulfilling thing to see that this woman really exists and to meet her in person.

Elliot Moss
Because eight years ago this was an idea that you thought maybe this is going to work I am going to create this fashion business and create a brand.

Misha Nonoo
Yeah.

Elliot Moss
And of course you hadn’t done any online dating at that point, you were just… that was your first foray.

Misha Nonoo
Exactly.

Elliot Moss
What were those early days like when you were going from an idea into actual execution?

Misha Nonoo
I quite like that we are likening this to dating so…

Elliot Moss
We can keep this up its fine.

Misha Nonoo
…it was a very different type of courtship then. When I started eight years ago it was a traditional fashion business in the sense that it was a wholesale business. I took orders from major retailers. My first retailers and the ones that I have worked with for the longest time were the likes of Berghold Goodman, Shopbop, Neiman Marcus you know, a lot of big players in the US and I did that for about five and a half years. It was four collections a year, there was a huge amount of waste with it because I would design you know, for the major collections, you would be designing about sixty different styles, twice a year and then for the more minor collections you would looking at thirty five styles. It was a huge amount of creative output and I did that for five and a half years and I started to see how retail was changing so dramatically, the landscape was changing. Big box retailers didn’t really feel as though they knew their customers, we’d go on the shop floor and ask sales people about the customer and it would be a very different story from what we would hear from the buyers who were often you know, controlling budgets across thirty five different doors and you know what someone wants in Atlanta is very different to what someone wants in New York City or London or Paris etcetera. So it became apparent to me that I was taking direction from people that actually didn’t necessarily know any better than I did and so with the rise in direct consumer in other industries I decided that I wanted to go direct and I wanted it to be online only to begin with and that’s when I kind of relaunched Misha Nonoo and it was a few different things I did all at once. I went inventory less so we are actually a sustainable fashion brand in all of our manufacturing practices in the sense that we don’t carry inventory. So after four months I launched in September of 2016 and by November I was seeing all of those big box players that are online, the likes of Net-a-Porter and Farfetched and all of them going on sale and you know, by November it isn’t necessarily even cold so all of the full winter things, there’s coats and all those beautiful pieces were already on 50% off. Now why would you be inclined to buy anything at full price if everything is promotionally driven? So I understood why retailers were doing it, it is because you have stock that you need to sell off and we had had a good season but we also had about 30% of our stock to sell off so I was thinking about how not to you know, damage the environment, the waste that we were looking at that was going to contribute to landfill, it really upset me and also not damage the brand by you know, having to compete with these retailers. So I went inventory less. It took us about ten months to set up that whole programme and by let’s say probably June/July of 2017 we had our on demand manufacturing practices in place. We work with a female owned factory, their headquarters are in Hong Kong and they produce in Shenzhen in China and I go myself twice a year, my CEO two times a year also to check on everything but I went inventory less and then I decided to go very, very streamlined in the way that we designed the collection so we were looking at how we could create a wardrobe for a woman that also felt a little bit more minimal. The whole thing about fashion is people are constantly trying to sell you more. You know these are the five clutches that you need, these are the four hundred and fifty nine different trench coats that you might need this season. Realistically if you have a beautiful piece in your wardrobe you don’t need to buy another thing that is very similar a year later and so I was kind of borrowing from the concept of how men dress and how men build their wardrobe and invest in pieces and we started off with the easy eight which is the kind of modular foundational wardrobe in the collection. A wardrobe that we kind of suggest you start with in the collection and then we built on that and went into you know other pieces that we added but everything goes back to that modular foundational eight.

Elliot Moss
I am going to hold you there because if you manage to just take on board all of those things, you are a genius because this is my amazing guest, Misha Nonoo who has got so much to talk about and I want to pick up on so many things that you have just said around on demand manufacturing, around the notion of having no inventory and all the other related stuff and I like the idea of you taking a nod from the way that a man dresses. That’s brilliant, although not the way that I dress obviously.

Misha Nonoo
No not you.

Elliot Moss
Thank you Misha. There you go, that was quick wasn’t it, it didn’t take long to dispel the myth that I don’t dress well. Time for some more music right now, we will be coming back to Misha in a moment, this is Alex Malheiros & Banda Utopia featuring Sabrina Malheiros with Uno Esta.

That was the lovely sound of Alex Malheiros & Banda Utopia featuring Sabrina Malheiros with Uno Esta. Misha Nonoo is my Business Shaper, she, if you were listening earlier has just given a brilliant exposition of everything to do with her take on fashion. What strikes me, Misha, reading about you and now meeting you is the clarity of thought you had back then about what was wrong and the belief in yourself to go and do something about it. I want to ask you about that belief. Where has that belief come from? Because clarity is one thing, often I meet lots of smart people in here, I am very lucky and obviously lots of smart people that aren’t in here but this belief that they have I think is what singles out most of my Business Shapers. Tell me where that’s come from, that inner sense of I am right?

Misha Nonoo
You know I think that people often say to me you know, you are clearly very risk adverse and actually it is not necessarily true that I am risk adverse in my personal life but professionally I have always been risk adverse and I think that that comes from genuinely having taken the steps and learnt about the fashion industry you know, Malcolm Gladwell in Outliers talks about the ten thousand hour rule and if you have put in ten thousand hours it makes you an expert in something. That is a really, really long time, I mean he’s got a point and I had spent more than ten thousand hours before I’d even started my own brand. I think I had probably spent ten thousand hours just having an inkling of thinking of having my own brand aged fifteen so I was always really passionate about the industry and I knew so much about clothes, about the details of clothes, about how you manufacture clothes and I think that that is really what allows me the confidence to make these decisions because it is not coming from a place where I don’t know my subject matter.

Elliot Moss
And when you, and you said to me again, you know, I was… I didn’t know any less than the people in Neiman Marcus or whoever it might have been…

Misha Nonoo
Right.

Elliot Moss
…because they didn’t know what the woman in Atlanta wanted versus the woman in Chicago versus the woman in New York or whatever and so therefore I needed to get closer. When you started to get closer did the answers reveal themselves or was it like most research where you are interpreting what you are hearing?

Misha Nonoo
It’s a little bit of both and I think that that’s actually the thing that is so nice about having this off line activation in our pop-up shop, is that it validates even further what you found out online. So for example, in the first you know two and a half years up until this point basically we kind of, we had a relationship with the customer, we know, she talks to us on social media, she talks to us through email. We have all of these different subscribers and we have all these different customers but there is only so far you can go through an email or a telephone call in asking somebody so tell me, what is it that you do actually? What do you do? Because it’s actually, it’s very revealing what somebody spends their time doing but it’s quite an intimate question and it isn’t necessarily appropriate right away to ask your customer so what do you do? The first thing that I ask someone that walks through the shop doors after I have told them a little bit about the ethos and philosophy of the brand if they don’t already know about it, is I say ‘so tell me, what is it that you spend your time doing? What do you do?’ and we are filling a gap in the market. My mission is to fill a white space in the market that I see for dressing a woman from 9.00am to 9.00pm and beyond. So giving her that versatile functional wardrobe whilst still being chic. So you know, I had an inkling that this woman was a corporate lawyer or a stockbroker or you know had started her own interior design firm but when you come in, when women come in within the first six days of being in business, those are the women that are coming into the store and that are seeking you out or you know, a girl that’s at UPenn and she is visiting her parents that live in London and she is about to go and start her first internship over the summer or you know, a woman that works at LinkedIn or YouTube and like that’s it, that is who I thought you were but this validates it properly now. And I suppose that’s the issue for a lot of the buyers and major retailers is that they don’t have the time to do all of the numbers and all the buying and all of that and beyond the shop floor and is it really appropriate to ask those questions? You know maybe I can get away with it because I am there and you know you come into my store and it’s an intimate experience with me but you know, as a buyer can you… is that something that’s allowed? So what is it that you do exactly? It might be like you know, forty minutes deep before you are allowed to get to that point.

Elliot Moss
And that’s a very important part of the equation. That’s almost the most critical because it is who is going to buy you. In terms of your approach to the on demand manufacturing and the fact that you are interested in sustainability, I want to come on to women led factories in China as well. How do you then square the circle because now I know who she is and now I want to deliver something which is actually not wrecking the environment. How do you make sure those come together without a problem?

Misha Nonoo
That’s actually a great question because the reason that I can do this is because we are giving you pieces that are foundational items. They are you’re hero pieces in your wardrobe. They are not the dress that you need to wear, you are coming in a Thursday and you need to pick something up to wear to a party on Saturday night. So a critical part of the equation is that somebody comes in and they purchase a piece, it is shipped to them within 7 to 10 business days and that means that it is made from scratch and it is shipped you know, to the customer. So 7 to 10 business days is a really you know, it is a great work around but as a result it means that it can’t be something that you need right away. It is a piece that you are keeping in a wardrobe and you are investing in your wardrobe so it is like a wardrobe classic staple piece.

Elliot Moss
Brilliant.

Misha Nonoo
So that’s exactly the point. If I was trying to give you, you know, you trend driven seasonal pieces this on demand manufacturing aspect wouldn’t work in the same way.

Elliot Moss
Stay with me for much more from my brilliant guest, Misha Nonoo, she will be back in a couple of minutes but first we are going to hear from our programme partners, Mishcon de Reya, hopefully they have got some very good advice for your business.

There are many ways for you to enjoy all our former Jazz Shapers and indeed to hear this programme again. You can ask Alexa to play Jazz Shapers and there you can hear many of the recent shows or if you pop Jazz Shapers into iTunes or your preferred podcast platform you can enjoy the full archive there. But back to today’s guest, it’s Misha Nonoo, she’s the Founder and Creative Director at Misha Nonoo, the womenswear fashion label. I often say this but when I start doing the research for a brand or a person I know nothing generally. Sometimes I do you know, if it is someone that is sort of globally famous but here you, maybe you will be globally famous Misha, let’s not assume that won’t happen, and then you dig into the story and I am always intrigued about where things have come from and people’s belief and things like that. Right now you have hit on a moment in time where people really do care about the environment over the last few months in this country and probably in the States and probably globally actually, we are seeing a real move towards that. As you build your ability to deliver on it, what are the sorts of things that you need to take into consideration? How do you ensure that your supply chain is the right supply chain? How do you ensure that the products are of good quality as well because often people think that you have to make a sacrifice if you are being sustainable?

Misha Nonoo
Yeah. Right. No I think that from you know, there’s a couple of different things there. So for example when we talk about making sure that our supply chain, you know we have transparency in to our supply chain, our manufacturer is actually an investor in the business which I think is really kind of a critical piece of the puzzle. She has a small part of the business so she is you know invested in making sure that it is successful and also invested in making sure that you know, we aren’t caught having you know, some kind of malpractice suit because of labour practices in China etcetera, etcetera. So you know as much as me and my team are there four times a year, we have a key senior person on staff that we pay for, you know, we actually have the sample room sewers that we pay for and they are on our payroll. So as much as possible we are kind of on top of all of those things without actually being in the factory with them every day. So that’s one part of the sustainable component. The other part that you speak about, quality is really critical too. That was kind of why it took ten months to really iron out the kinks because when you think about people producing a line of things, if you are producing a line of UK size 12 trousers for a women, they are all being cut at the same time, they are all being sewn at the same time and so there are very, very minimal changes. When you are producing something piece by piece by piece, there is a lot more that can go wrong. So we had to really, really focus on not so much a pair of trousers or a shirt for example, but things like a jump suit which we also do piece by piece and you know, it is delivered within 7 to 10 business days. That has so much complexity to it that we really needed to make sure that the sewers knew exactly rigorously what they were producing and so to that point we don’t introduce that much new product. These people are producing the same things over and over and over again. They might not be doing them in you know mass quantities at once but they are producing let’s say the same you know, the foundational wardrobe is eight pieces now with the size of the business as it is growing, let’s say they are producing the same fifteen pieces day in, day out and so when we introduce a new product if it doesn’t start to become core within the first three to four months we actually retire it.

Elliot Moss
You drop it?

Misha Nonoo
Yeah.

Elliot Moss
And so as you are talking I am thinking about your team that you have assembled and whether those are people that are based in the factory or those are people based in head office or anywhere else in the different parts of your business. How have you ensured that the quality control person knows what they are doing? How have you ensured that the finances work because again if I go back to 2011 you are setting up this business and you’ve got this great idea, you have then actually got to bring this orchestra to life?

Misha Nonoo
Yeah.

Elliot Moss
So how did you go about finding those people?

Misha Nonoo
But I will tell you Elliot, a lot of mistakes. I think HR is the hardest part honestly. Especially when you are potentially younger than some of the people that you are employing and you don’t have the experience in their field. People always say that you know, you should hire your weaknesses and I am actually a firm believer in trying to learn about that area before you hire into it because I have been burnt in the past where I am like ‘Oh My God, great finance, I can give that to somebody else – excellent’ and then you end up with a bookkeeper that messes up your books and things aren’t right and then it comes to the end of the year and you are doing your taxes and you are like ‘well none of this makes sense’ and that has actually happened. So I think that it is kind of you know, it would be too wonderful to just kind of give away the things that you don’t want to do. Unfortunately you really have to be diligent and learn about it and you know to be honest with you, I am in the shop from… we open at 10.00, I am in the shop from sometimes 8.30 – 9.00am in the morning until after we close at 7.00pm and then I go home and I am working and then you know, I am planning a wedding so I am working on that so you know you go to bed at 1.00 o’clock in the morning and it is not all rosy, it is a tonne of work and now we have a team in place but we are growing slowly and I keep a really tight sheep… sheep!!! Ship. It’s a lean machine that I am running and it is definitely something that I am aware of you know from a cash flow perspective and all of that. The sustainable aspect is great also because it’s business sustainable. You know, from a… you know, we used to have so much money tied up in inventory that we don’t have to deal with anymore so it’s been great across the board but I mean there is still kinks every single day and unfortunately when you have a young team they are moving back to Australia, or they are getting married and you know they want to have children or any of those wonderful things in life that mean that you’ve then got to find somebody else and you get so attached to people so it’s hard when people leave.

Elliot Moss
You get attached to the sheep and the ships.

Misha Nonoo
Yes.

Elliot Moss
Tight sheep and tight ships are very important but actually seriously very good advice there from Misha about going slowly and also learning about your areas of weakness rather than just delegating them. In terms of your own leadership style it strikes me again that you are going to be very thorough, that Malcolm Gladwell the thousand hours means you have put your graft in so people look at you and go ‘she does know’. What is your interaction like with these people and again you kind of gave a little bit away and said I just love, you know, you start to fall in love with people and feel very connected…

Misha Nonoo
Yeah.

Elliot Moss
…and that’s good. How would they define your style of leadership if they were in the room with us now?

Misha Nonoo
I would actually say that they would think that I am a bit more of a hands off manager but maybe I am just thinking that because now that I think about it I don’t delegate enough and I get into weaves of everything with everyone. So maybe I am not so hands off, maybe I am a complete micro manager and I am just fooling myself. But I think that they would say that I am very much a colleague as opposed to a boss you know, I see everybody as being equal in the team even the, you know the interns that come in. They get afforded the opportunity to work with the senior members of the team and you know we are still very small, we are about ten in New York and then we’ve got about ten in Hong Kong and China so we are again to that idea of keeping a lean business model. But I think that to be honest with you I am just somebody who enjoys working with other people and I am a very collaborative person so you know you can always ask me anything and that’s actually something we do on social media, we have like this section called ‘Ask Misha’ and we get the most hilarious questions from people that are completely unfashion related.

Elliot Moss
Dear Misha….

Misha Nonoo
Yeah, yeah. No so what does Thatcher like to eat? I am like…

Elliot Moss
Thatcher is your dog.

Misha Nonoo
Thatcher is my dog yeah.

Elliot Moss
That’s right.

Misha Nonoo
I am like umm okay we can get into this. But no we, we… I feel like I am a very accessible boss and I am very accessible as a person. I think that you know that extends even to being in the store. People are kind of shocked when they walk in and they maybe follow us on social media and they are like…

Elliot Moss
Here she is.

Misha Nonoo
…that’s her and I am like yeah, yeah I want to meet you and I want to you know, dress you and all of that.

Elliot Moss
You said here, I am quoting from an interview recently.

Misha Nonoo
Oh gosh.

Elliot Moss
I love doing this bit.

“I am a very impatient person, if I want something I’ve got to have it right now. That isn’t the way that life works though.”

Misha Nonoo
No unfortunately.

Elliot Moss
So unfortunately but the impatience I imagine is the drive right?

Misha Nonoo
The impatience is the drive and I suppose…

Elliot Moss
You see the vision and you go, come on let’s get there. We can get there can’t we?

Misha Nonoo
You know, I am like you know, we are two and a half years in to this new model and I am like ‘why aren’t we doing this and why haven’t we got that’ and you know, the rest of the people around me are like you are two and a half years into this model like, you know I suppose in a way though because I did almost six years in the old model I feel as though I have been doing this for so long and that by the way, that isn’t just in business that I am impatient, that extends to every area of my life. I see something, I want to do it and I want to kind of nail it right away.

Elliot Moss
I am not getting in the way.

Misha Nonoo
No.

Elliot Moss
Whatever you want you can have it.

Misha Nonoo
Done.

Elliot Moss
That seems simple. I think that’s very clear.

Misha Nonoo
Yeah it’s a very difficult thing for me to hold back and if I think that something can be bettered, I have an opinion and I share that.

Elliot Moss
In terms of that drive, where has that come from do you think?

Misha Nonoo
I would say it is very much my father, my father was a businessman and you know, he is a deeply impatient person with myself, with my mother, you know, he kind of knows exactly what he wants and he wants to get it right now. My mother is much more mellow and relaxed but I think that it probably comes from him and also I suppose that as an ambitious person when you start to get results that becomes very addictive cycle to live in so you know when something works or even if something fails and you move on quickly and then you move on to something that works, it becomes something that becomes addictive so it is not even necessarily that I think I probably was always impatient even as a child but I think that my impatience has in business at least, served me quite well. In my personal life I try to be more and more patient because ultimately you realise that in partnership you… it’s very, very important, even with your team members that you give people the time to be themselves and to grow into what they are as well.

Elliot Moss
Hard though isn’t it. I mean if you are naturally impatient that’s not going to suddenly stop.

Misha Nonoo
Yes. Yeah because you think that everything should be seen through your lens.

Elliot Moss
But it shouldn’t. I agree Misha, that’s how I feel about life. I have had no issues obviously. Stay with me for my final chat with Misha Nonoo, my Business Shaper plus we will be playing a track from Kurt Elling, that’s all in just a moment, don’t go anywhere.

That was Golden Lady from Kurt Elling and delicious it was too. I am with Misha Nonoo just for a few more minutes and we talked about a bunch of stuff and I hope people have got a sense of you. I certainly have. We haven’t talked about the money and I think, I’d like to know what your attitude is towards it because obviously the business is doing well, it’s still young. Are you making money at this point in the business?

Misha Nonoo
Yeah. We… it depends on months whether or not we actually break profitability but we are pretty much at breakeven point all the time.

Elliot Moss
Have you got a, have you got a big enough scalable model that works because it strikes me that obviously it is quite difficult in the way that you are going about business?

Misha Nonoo
Yeah I mean in the sense that we… my dream is to really, because for me it is not about you know, cashing out or any of that kind of stuff. The business is in my name and again it wasn’t necessarily something that I thought about all that long and hard when I put the business in my name you know, a lot of people are like so did you think about that? You know what if you sell the business and I am like right yeah. It’s already on the door anyway so it was the only name I could come up with. So for me I am in it for the long haul and you know there are a lot of brands particularly in America right now that are direct to consumer that are all about you know, having huge valuations, raising huge rounds of money and all that kind of stuff and I am watching that with great interest honestly because I feel as though what comes up, often comes down and when things go up too quickly I see them also kind of deflate very quickly. So I took on a small seed round of investment about a year and a half ago from friends and family and that has sustained us to this point. In my mind I would like to get to a certain level of business probably at least doubling the business before I will take on any more money and really it is because I have always felt very strongly about being responsible with money and you know if you are taking money from other people like it is not just to burn through it and grow as quickly as possible. I mean, I think that there is a lot that can be done in small ways, that’s the beautiful thing about having this kind of entrepreneurial mind-set and entrepreneurial business. You can prototype so much and if it works, move with it and it it doesn’t, kill it and I think the thing for example, with on demand, you know, when we first started in the business and it was much smaller we were able to get goods to people in 3 to 5 business days. But now as the business is growing, growing, growing you know we really have to say in order to be completely honest and up front with you about when you are going to get your product, it is 7 to 10 business days and that is purely because we are growing at a much higher rate now.

Elliot Moss
But you are in it for the long haul?

Misha Nonoo
A hundred percent.
Elliot Moss
And if that’s the case, then is the ambition simply to have as many women enjoy having fantastic things in their wardrobe which are produced in a fair and sustainable way? Is that what it is about?

Misha Nonoo
That’s definitely a big part of it. I think really the big ambition… my big ambition, I grew up in the Middle East, I was born in Bahrain and I lived there for the first ten years of my life and I suppose I absorbed a lot of their culture sublimely even at that age you know, I grew up in a traditional family, my father worked, my mother was a stay at home mum and I think for me the collection has always been about a platform to empower women and that word is so over-used now empowering, empowering, empowering but the reality is, call it what you like, I believe in people being able to have autonomy in their life and being able to move through your day as seamlessly as possible. So I want to give you the confidence to do whatever it is that you want to do and I suppose that’s why I love meeting the woman and seeing that she is an empowered woman that works and that is in charge of her life and I guess that that is really the big ambition. It is not… the sustainability factor is you know something that I really enjoy and I am solving a problem there but the real dream and my soulful ambition is to empower women to do what they want to do in life.

Elliot Moss
I think that’s a really brilliant ambition.

Misha Nonoo
Thank you.

Elliot Moss
Stay with it, good luck. May the force be with you.

Misha Nonoo
Thank you.

Elliot Moss
Before I let you disappear though today, back to the pop-up…

Misha Nonoo
Yes.

Elliot Moss
…at some point, what’s your song choice and why have you chosen it?

Misha Nonoo
It is Freddie Freeloader and it’s Miles Davis and I you know, I didn’t actually love jazz when I was little until I discovered Miles Davis. My dad is a huge jazz lover and he would you know, kind of show me all this other jazz and whatever and I was like nope, nope, nope not into it and then he turned me on to Miles Davis and I was like now I get it. So that was my entry and my forever favourite.

Elliot Moss
That was Freddie Freeloader from Miles Davis, the song choice of my Business Shaper, Misha Nonoo. She talked about putting in those ten thousand hours of understanding into her business which enables her to be super confident and have belief. She talked about being addicted to success – when it works I just want to get more of it – and she talked about critically the future of this business being all about a platform for empowering women. Really brilliant stuff.

You can hear our conversation with Misha all over again whenever you would like to as a podcast, just search Jazz Shapers or ask your smart speaker to play Jazz Shapers or if you are up nice and early Monday morning you can catch this programme again just before the business breakfast at 5.00am on Jazz FM. We are back next Saturday from 9.00 with our next Business Shaper, it is the Founder and CEO of kid’s media company Bright Little Labs, Sophie Deen is our guest. Up next after the news at 10.00 it is Nigel Williams with more music plus interviews and live sessions too. That’s it from me and Jazz Shapers, have a great weekend.

We hope you enjoyed that edition of Jazz Shapers. You will find hundreds more guests available for you to listen to in our archive. To find out more, just search Jazz Shapers and iTunes or your favourite podcast platform or head over to mishcon.com/jazzshapers.

Misha Nonoo is the Founder and Creative Director of Misha Nonoo, a womenswear fashion label with sustainability at its core. Born in Bahrain and raised in London, Misha has always known that she wanted to be a fashion designer, winning industry recognition for her eponymous label in 2013 when she became a finalist for the 2013 CFDA Vogue Fashion Fund. She has also been named as one of Forbes’ 30 under 30.

Pioneering the “Insta-Show”, Misha was the first designer to use social media as a venue for fashion shows and presented her Spring/Summer 2016 collection exclusively on Instagram (@mishanonoo_show) during New York Fashion Week. The innovative project reimagined traditional standards, for which she later secured the Fashion Futures award for best Beyond the Runway experience. Most recently Misha Nonoo established ‘on-demand’ manufacturing – a movement aimed at democratising the fashion industry to deliver sustainable production focused on revolutionizing the sourcing and selling of luxury fashion.

Nonoo continues to push boundaries by marrying designs with innovative digital concepts that are celebrated by women who embrace their femininity whilst pursuing their goals.

Follow Misha on Twitter @mishanonoo.

I started to see how dramatically retail was changing.

I was always really passionate about the industry and I knew so much about clothes.

Why would you be inclined to buy anything at full price if everything is promotionally driven?

If you have a beautiful piece in your wardrobe, you don’t need to buy something else that is similar.

I have always been risk adverse in my professional life.

I want to give women a versatile, functional  whilst being chic.

We have transparency in to our supply chain.

I am very much a colleague as opposed to a boss.

I am just somebody who enjoys working with other people and am very collaborative.

It’s very important, especially with your team members that you give people the time to be themselves and to grow.

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